Bunkerbarge
This is another demonstration of just how simple and straightforward it can be to take a standard, out of the box, die cast lorry and make it into a much more believable model for your layout.

This was originally a LLedo Trackside model and although a 'Limited Edition' it is one of 11,000!  However they can be picked up new for less than a five pound note so certainly not expensive.  As to just how accurate the model is I am sure will be open to debate however from my own experience of such vehicles it certainly looks good enough to me to look the part on a model railway layout.

   s-l1600a.jpg 

s-l1600 (4)b.jpg 

  

Making it into a more realistic model can be as involved or as simple as you wish, starting with nothing more than a dirty wash through to adding detail until you get fed up with it.  I go for somewhere in the middle.

The painting starts with a very watered down wash.  I use AK Interactive enamel washes with 'Track Dirt' being the most used as it is a very good overall grimy colour that can be adjusted easily to suit different situations.  This 'Track' refers to tank tracks!  Here I add around 50% thinners and paint the entire model.  Most of it is then wiped away with either a cotton bud of the Tamiya type, or a piece of lint free cloth.  Either way you should be left with nothing more than a hint of enhanced shadows.  Try not to wipe away the wash from creases and crevices.  After that I painted the white roof with Railmatch 'Roof Dirt'.  When the roof dirt had dried I streaked it with a wide flat brush dampened with a little thinners to streak the paint. After the wash is completely dry overnight the whole model gets a spray of Testors Dulkote.  if you put the Dulkote on before the wash the wash will not wipe away properly and will make a mess.

After the wash I add a bit of detail with such things as oily enamels around linkages and metallic finishes on chassis parts.  Humbrol metalcote is good here as you can rub it with your fingers afterwards and the metallic sheen comes through.  I painted the boiler top, bottom and funnel with the metal cote before buffing up and finishing off with a fine matt black from the airbrush. I also painted the rear deck with a light matt tan.

23-09-18-02RailwayWeatheredSteamLorry2.jpg 


The wheels get a little bit more of the 'Track Wash' around the hubs but a lot less thinners is added this time, just to enhance the wheel fastenings and this same wash is added to the planking on the rear deck.  The base tan colour must be thoroughly hard if you want to put an enamel wash over it otherwise it will lift the base coat.  I give it a few days.

Next is a build up with the airbrush of something along the colour of Rail Match 'Track Dirt', this 'Track' is railway track! If you don't want to use an airbrush then you can dry brush the paint on carefully.  We will blend this in next.  

23-09-18-05RailwayWeatheredSteamLorry5.jpg 
  

The final painting step is to blend everything in with pigments.  This is why with such a subject in this size you can get away without an airbrush.  The dry brushing can now be blended in with appropriate colours using browns around the chassis, rust colours on a couple of selected pieces, black around the boiler and funnel and light grey ash around the bottom pan.  The Dulkote will help the pigments adhere so you do not need a great deal.

Lastly it is time to turn your imagination to the bits and pieces that you want to place in the back.  The moulded parts are pretty dire but will be well hidden by the additions so there is no point in trying to remove them.  Being a heavy haulage lorry various lifting and towing gear were added such as baulks of timer, cut from  stock wood and weathered, ropes of varying types coiled up and painted with washes and a few rope blocks, again painted up with a little dry brush weathering.  I also added some marine chain, painted up and glued into the back.  I added a couple of pieces of plastic coated rod for the timber rack, super glued into drilled holes and then a few baulks of 'heavy timber stored in the rack.

23-09-18-07RailwayWeatheredSteamLorry7.jpg 
  

All in all for very little expense and very little effort you have an individual lorry to enhance the layout that can look extremely authentic.  An airbrush can make life a little quicker and easier but it is certainly not absolutely necessary.  

23-09-18-08RailwayWeatheredSteamLorry8.jpg 
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Capt Andy
What a transformation, that last photo looks superb, what Era would that be ?
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Bunkerbarge
Thanks for the comment.  The layout is going to be set in 1948 so one or two steam Sentinels still in service.  Well they are in my rural location!!
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LarryG
In the late 1940's/early 1950's, dung, household coal, milk, groceries and much ice cream was handled by horse & cart, so the sight of a steam lorry passing through Oldham every late afternoon made a neat change. A good many ancient looking Laurel & Hardy type vans also abounded plus of course pre-war buses adding smoke to the already polluted Lancashire cotton-town.
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Bunkerbarge
I'd better learn how to weather a horse next!!
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LarryG
Bunkerbarge wrote:
I'd better learn how to weather a horse next!!

This got me wondering how healthy wild horses keep their coats so clean and gleaming. Cart horses often looked weathered especially the white ones with road dust or mud all over their lower legs.
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BarryM
A great tutorial. Thank you for posting.
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Capt Andy
LarryG wrote:

This got me wondering how healthy wild horses keep their coats so clean and gleaming. Cart horses often looked weathered especially the white ones with road dust or mud all over their lower legs.


I must consider this as I intend to have many horse drawn commercial carts wagons on my diorama 🙂. Oldham Larry, My Grandfather founded Malpass weighing Machines that later became Avery's. Again Richard love this model, I can almost smell it 🙂 
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Mister Rusty
Superb finish, just right.
Personally l would get rid of the toy axle ends that visually spoil all of Lledo's models.
Pre-war and restored, l would finish them as polished brass, post-war, l would use black.
Possibly, just kiss them with a file to create more of a tube shape, rather than a dome, then call them axle boxes. I hav ehad to grease these on a restored wagon.
And glazing? Restored vehicles usually are glazed, despite having the boiler in the cab.
Period photos would certainly help in this case. 
If l can, I will get photos of the real thing when l go to my friend's yard, l think that theirs is still in their fleet, it is restored as a timber tractor.
just trying to help.
Pete
Bunkerbarge,
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Could anyone reading  this, please advise Jazavalley or another admin , thanks
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Pete
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Bunkerbarge
All interesting points Pete, thanks for sharing and thanks for the compliment.  I completely agree the axle ends don't do it justice and I was sorely tempted to grind them off completely and simply glue the wheels but got itchy fingers wanting to get on with the painting and I could not decide how best to deal with the rear ones!  I might just paint them over with something a bit more solid though.  The biggest disappointment for me is the fact that the wheels do not turn and dead straight front wheels look very unrealistic.  There again it did cost less than a fiver so I really cannot complain.

For me weathering should always follow a period photograph as guessing, estimating or using your imagination will almost certainly lead you astray and you end up with something very unrealistic.  The trouble is, of course, that appropriate period photographs of such vehicles in colour are extremely rare so then you have no choice but to look at something 'close' and project onto your own example.

I even find this with weathering 1940's locomotives as period colour photographs are not as numerous as much later periods.  I have collected enough good books to make reasonable attempts but vehicle photographs of the period are much more rare.  There are plenty of refurbished and restored examples and I have a number of books with black and white pictures  but they are really of limited use for period weathering.
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Mister Rusty
A fair compromise can be found by watching the 'playpen' at The Great Dorset Steam Fair. It is where they work the engines hard, uphill on unmade surfaces. Also, that event has unrestored plant and vehicles, so many, many photos are available on-line.
Hope this helps someone.
JTTH
Pete
Bunkerbarge,
I am locked out, hooked up on your last message, this is the only way that l can get into the forum.
Anyone else having issues?
Please check.
Could anyone reading  this, please advise Jazavalley or another admin , thanks
Be careful, in case it's a virus. The message received is:-
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Pete
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Mister Rusty
As with modern lorries, usually cab units, an owner-operator or single driver machine will always show the driver's pride in his rig, even JCBs and other plant. If they are jockeyed by any and everyone, then they soon look unkempt.
In the 1970s, l chased a fleet of over a dozen Caterpillar D9s around the UK as service manager, having spent part of my apprenticeship cleaning the plant ex-site before entering the dealer's workshop,  so the phrase 'here's mud in yer eye' brings back memories, many hilarious, but here is not the time or place.
Maybe, just maybe if my arm was twisted, some may turn up.
Bunkerbarge,
I am locked out, hooked up on your last message, this is the only way that l can get into the forum.
Anyone else having issues?
Please check.
Could anyone reading  this, please advise Jazavalley or another admin , thanks
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Pete
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Bunkerbarge
I did once go for a ride on this magnificent beast.  I see what you mean about the front axle now.  This was around Whitby, well known for its extremely steep hills.  Going uphill you could feel the power going into the wheels with every stroke of the pistons and going down there was all sorts of blowback going on, I have no idea why or how, but this resulted in flames leaping back out of the furnace.  I had to sit at the front so I could see how the thing was driven.  Quite a memorable experience. 30-06-09-57WhitbySteamBusElizabeth4.jpg
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Mister Rusty
WOW! 
Bunkerbarge,
I am locked out, hooked up on your last message, this is the only way that l can get into the forum.
Anyone else having issues?
Please check.
Could anyone reading  this, please advise Jazavalley or another admin , thanks
Be careful, in case it's a virus. The message received is:-
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Pete
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LarryG
Weathering of road vehicles is a lot down to common sense. No matter how effective were the mudguards, some muck off the tyres would still be thrown back. How wide was the body in relation to the tracking. Would an operator bother to keep his vehicles clean?  How many would clean the chassis? What did the vehicle usually carry? Where did it operate most of the time. And remember, they weren't allowed to go very fast.

When I worked for McAlpines, the lorries got into a right state working from quarries to site. Bonuses meant everything and there was no time for cleaning, even for privately owned lorries. Fuel tanker always seemed to be well cared for. I worked for BR Parcels in the late 1950's when they were blood & custard. Someone maybe cleaned them Saturday afternoons when they were off the road, but one wouldn't think so. Muck built up over the cab and up the back end of the van part. 

Consider winter, especially in busy towns and cities, and you end up with everything looking a mess from salt, slush and whatever. Another job I did was on the buses and frozen cleaning facilities lead to the obvious.
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