Jaz Avalley JazAvalley Show full post »
Bunkerbarge
Interestingly when these first started to make themselves known I remember my Father's attitude being less than positive.  He always thought of them as ugly and not 'proper' trains!

I must admit I have now grown older with the feeling that an A3 is far more attractive than an A4 or a Coronation.  I like to see the internal shape of things rather than cover it all up with some tin plate.  A bit like why I never liked the Ariel Arrow and Leader and why I hated the Triumph bathtub rear end on the Thunderbird.
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Peter Rust Rusty Pete
BB
😟Trains??!!!?? 😠
Locomotives please😝
Even engine is not correct as it refers to the motion-creating parts, not the kettle, wheels or cab.
A tender does not constitute the term train, nor does a singular brake van.
Ariel Arrow/Leader, agreed looks were not too hot, but the pressed frame was faster to complete, stiffer and lighter, all advantageous. Just a pity about British 2-strokes and vertical split cases oozing oil  as the case is pressurised. Wife's late brother was chief tester on Square 4 and the tin-cans.

Wheers mi cowut?
 l wo slam the doowa wen l goo owt 😆
More than one way to skin a cat ðŸ˜‰
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Peter pc163
Julian wrote:
Does anyone have any information about the best A4 sound installations?

J


Sound sample

[**You may like to move this Post to another Thread]

BR Peppercorn class A1 'Tornado' 60163 ~ Driving Sound Test

Being a 3-cylinder Loco ~ the sound chip isn't synced to the piston [port] steam exhaust!!

In slow speed ~ it should emit steam 6 times per revolution!! 



What's anoying with these cheap sound locos ~ you have no ability to change any CV's except CV1. Not syncing to piston exhaust position ~ the sound locos are really just a gymmick. 

https://www.hornby.com/us-en/railroad-4-6-2-tornado-peppercorn-class-a1.html

In 1990 a group of like-minded people came together in the belief that they could construct from new, a Peppercorn Class A1 Pacific locomotive. The first steam locomotive built in the United Kingdom since 'Evening Star' in 1960 and it would be built to meet modern safety and certification standards to enable it to run on mainline connected heritage railways. After a period of nearly 20 years the dream became a reality on the 29th July 2008 when locomotive No. 60163 'Tornado' moved under its own power at Darlington.

shopping.png
Cheers,
Peter
pc163
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Julian


Sound sample

[**You may like to move this Post to another Thread]

BR Peppercorn class A1 'Tornado' 60163 ~ Driving Sound Test

Being a 3-cylinder Loco ~ the sound chip isn't synced to the piston [port] steam exhaust!!

In slow speed ~ it should emit steam 6 times per revolution!! 



What's anoying with these cheap sound locos ~ you have no ability to change any CV's except CV1. Not syncing to piston exhaust position ~ the sound locos are really just a gymmick. 

https://www.hornby.com/us-en/railroad-4-6-2-tornado-peppercorn-class-a1.html

In 1990 a group of like-minded people came together in the belief that they could construct from new, a Peppercorn Class A1 Pacific locomotive. The first steam locomotive built in the United Kingdom since 'Evening Star' in 1960 and it would be built to meet modern safety and certification standards to enable it to run on mainline connected heritage railways. After a period of nearly 20 years the dream became a reality on the 29th July 2008 when locomotive No. 60163 'Tornado' moved under its own power at Darlington.


The above is true enough, although to be fair, to Hornby, they do also add 
"Quote" 
RailRoad

Our Hornby RailRoad collection provides a perfect entry into the exciting world of 00 gauge railway modelling. Designed to be less easily damaged, yet maintaining attractive detailing and accurate liveries, the range is ideal for both the younger enthusiast and experienced modeller.
"Endquote"

I would be inclined to assume that they would expect the "Experienced" modeller to use it a start point.  I do have a Railroad TTS model, although not the Tornado TTS, which is quite fun - for what it is.  All the other sound Boards I have are much more complete and flexible, which is, part reason, why I asked if anyone had information about the best A4 sound installations, for the A4, Sir Nigel Gresley.  

Regards
Julian

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Bunkerbarge
In all fairness a basic sound decoder, such as  hornby TTS unit, while not being capable of generating an exhaust chuff six times every revolution, costs in the region of 20 to 30 pounds.  Ball park approximations, not specifics.

If you want six exhaust chuffs and the ability to time them to the wheels then you have to buy a decoder such as a Zimo 648, which is in the region of 100 to 120 pounds.

It really isn't fair to compare the two.  They both have a market and I'm sure that both are enjoyed equally by their respective owners.

I don't think there is a huge difference between the top end sound decoders from the main suppliers. I like Zimo because I am used to the same buttons being used for the same functions, such as number two for braking and number five for light to heavy load change over.  The quality of the sound is dependant a lot on the speaker and where you put it as well as the file that you load onto the decoder.  Most of mine are Paul Chetter files.

To offer an example I have a Zimo 648 decoder with a sugar cube speaker mounted in the tender of my A4.  It is loaded with a Paul Chetter file and the six exhaust chuffs are timed to one revolution.  It looks and sounds very effective and I'm very happy with it.
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Bunkerbarge
BB
😟Trains??!!!?? 😠
Locomotives please😝


Quite correct, slip of the mouse!  As regards 'engine' I would tend to think of that as the cylinders and associated linkages while including the boiler would be the propulsion plant.  I might just be slipping into more marine terminology though.

Still, I have friends who think I play with a 'Train Set' so I sometimes think the appropriate terminology can tend to slip a little!
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Peter Rust Rusty Pete
Hi all
I managed to collect a full set of these releases [44 of them !], and use them as a source of ''adaptable'' bodies or spares for conversions.
l have since bought 2 more A4s, but not for the launch price [£1.99 iirc] .
As Ruff has done, A3 chassis are 2 a penny, the bodies can be cheap [shop around], so it can be a satisfyingly cheap runner.
I am thinking of using them as a source for the W1 as 60700 [hush-hush], the streamlined B17s and even the P2/2s, using the P2/1 Railroad chassis and boiler with A4 valvegear.
[Way down the JTD [jobs-to-do] list though]
With regard to W1  - was it a 4-6-4 0r a 4-6-2-2? An intriguing unresolved issue, as it has both a bogie and a cartazzi axle under the cab.
More than one way to skin a cat ðŸ˜‰
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Peter Rust Rusty Pete
Bunkerbarge wrote:


  As regards 'engine' I would tend to think of that as the cylinders and associated linkages, spot on
while including the boiler would be the propulsion plant yep.  I might just be slipping into more marine terminology though.
Marine terminology came third, road traction was first [Cugnot], followed by Trevithick's design built for Blenkinsop by the Stephensons.
However, the maritime discipline has always insisted on correct terminology, in engineering terms. Mind, a sheet [to me] is summat on a bed, not a bit of string.

Still, I have friends who think I play with a 'Train Set' so I sometimes think the appropriate terminology can tend to slip a little!

Train Set, perfectly acceptable, especially when more than a loco is run on a track.

Here's a thought.
All of us of a certain age cringe when people go to the train station to catch a train, but they are correct as one does not go to catch a railway!
More than one way to skin a cat ðŸ˜‰
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Bunkerbarge
Always difficult to nail down the first action in a lengthy progression however in 1802 a vessel named the Charlotte Dundas is credited with being the first powered vessel to tow barges on the Forth and Clyde canal.  The vessel was basically a stern paddle wheeler with the single cylinder engine being mounted on the main deck.

The world's first locomotive-hauled railway journey took place on 21 February 1804, when Trevithick's unnamed steam locomotive hauled a train along the tramway of the Penydarren Ironworks at Merthyr Tydfil.

I therefore propose that marine propulsion was up and running two years before a railway locomotive.  Not that I am biased or anything!! 
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Ruffnut Thorston
And, the first powered vessel had a female name...😉😁
Best wishes,

Ruff...
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Julian
And, the first powered vessel had a female name...😉😁


Of course, what could be more natural, in those early industrial times...

"Charlot, a diminutive of Charles. It is of French origin meaning "free man" or "petite". "

Perfect description for the early Kettles.


Julian
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Peter Rust Rusty Pete


Trevithick's first loco was in fact built at Coalbrookdale Works, pre-empting the Pen-y-Darren loco by 2 years, so it looks to be a draw with Charlotte.
However there are articles on French efforts using Newcomen engines in paddle steamers in 1783, but it looks like a draw for high-pressure steam.
More than one way to skin a cat ðŸ˜‰
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Peter Rust Rusty Pete
Julian wrote:


Of course, what could be more natural, in those early industrial times...

"Charlot, a diminutive of Charles. It is of French origin meaning "free man" or "petite". "

Perfect description for the early Kettles.


Julian


The vessel's name was Charlotte Dundas, thus specifically female gender.
Charlotte is a female given name, a female form of the male name Charlot, a diminutive of Charles. It is of French origin meaning "free man" or "petite". The name dates back to at least the 14th century.
More than one way to skin a cat ðŸ˜‰
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