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Bunkerbarge
My understanding has always been that the expression 'Daisy Chaining' refers to a parallel connection.  The type of connection arrangement that Flashbang is referring to I would normally expect to be referred to as a 'Ring' or a 'Ring Main'.

Having seen first hand the way Flashbang handles his own forum and previously been on the receiving end of his aggression  I can only feel relief to see his comment: I'll not bother to post here again, as any input is immediately rebuffed. 

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Iain Morrison wimorrison
Isn't a ring main parallel also? It would be rather worrying (and expensive) if i had to plug something into every socket in the house and switch it on to make the television work 😉
Iain Morrison
Modelling h0e using Z21 with iTrain automation and Railcom
There are also unknown unknowns – the ones we don't know we don't know
http://www.wimorrison.co.uk
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AHJAY
Yes, it is a linked parallel connection. If a ring main was a series connection then even if you did plug something into each socket... it'd be remarkable if it turned on at all, given the different impedances and minimum voltage needs of each :-)

If we left the daisies out of the discussion, it'd actually be clearer....

'Nuff said I think.

regards, Ahjay
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Bunkerbarge
Isn't a ring main parallel also? It would be rather worrying (and expensive) if i had to plug something into every socket in the house and switch it on to make the television work 😉


Yes, my apologies, you are right of course, so I'm not so sure what the arrangement mentioned above would be described as.

As Ahjay says, leave the daisies out of it!!😁
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Mister Rusty
Daisy-chaining is a slang term for connecting panels together, one after another. It does not infer anything as to whether a parallel or series circuitry is used.
What it is used to infer is that the feeds between panels do not go back to the source before going on to the next unit.
Well, that was how my lecturer explained it to us.
We were taught to be specific as to whether a series or parallel circuit was to be used, not use slang or other sloppy, inaccurate terms.
I'm with Ahjay.
PS when creating a daisy-chain, how do you split the stems ?
Bunkerbarge,
I am locked out, hooked up on your last message, this is the only way that l can get into the forum.
Anyone else having issues?
Please check.
Could anyone reading  this, please advise Jazavalley or another admin , thanks
Be careful, in case it's a virus. The message received is:-
The last email that was sent to you was returned as spam by your email provider. Please update your account with a valid email address. Ahjay said  that my details are all in order, correct address and all.
Pete
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AHJAY
Using a fairies fingernail of course...

Ahjay
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Mister Rusty
AHJAY wrote:
Using a fairies fingernail of course...

Ahjay


Would that be Fairy Nuff's?
Bunkerbarge,
I am locked out, hooked up on your last message, this is the only way that l can get into the forum.
Anyone else having issues?
Please check.
Could anyone reading  this, please advise Jazavalley or another admin , thanks
Be careful, in case it's a virus. The message received is:-
The last email that was sent to you was returned as spam by your email provider. Please update your account with a valid email address. Ahjay said  that my details are all in order, correct address and all.
Pete
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Ron Solly Sol
[
Daisy-chaining is a slang term for connecting panels together, one after another. It does not infer anything as to whether a parallel or series circuitry is used.
What it is used to infer is that the feeds between panels do not go back to the source before going on to the next unit.
Well, that was how my lecturer explained it to us.
We were taught to be specific as to whether a series or parallel circuit was to be used, not use slang or other sloppy, inaccurate terms.
I'm with Ahjay.
PS when creating a daisy-chain, how do you split the stems ?


Pete -  Mister Rusty beat me to it, I too was using the words - daisy chain  - as a "slang" term and I assumed the OP Isher used them in the same manner and if my memory going back to the late 1950's is still good, my telecommunication lecturers used them as well.
Ron
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