Robert Joy Show full post »
Peter Rust Rusty Pete
Julian wrote:
It struck me a while ago, that full size electric power {3rd} rails are connected to each other by short lengths of wire, from the end of one rail. to the end of the next.  It made me wonder if that method might work for 1:76 size power, by simply soldering a bit of wire from one rail to the next, thus bypassing the insulating Fishplates.

Have I missed something, or is that feasib

Regards

Julian

Yes it is.
Personally, l cut the insulating fishplate out with a sharp knife,  then bond the rails with a short length of domestic pin soldered to the outside of the rail. 
If done with copper wire flattened to look like an authentic fishplate, it becomes an " invisible" bond.
More than one way to skin a cat ðŸ˜‰
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Pad-Ply-Pen
Was looking to find out why the term fishplate was used in a railway context and as most things has a nautical background fishplates were used to strengthen ships masts.
The last post mentioned copper wire and in the answer to my question it mentioned nickle silver and copper fishplates for modelling 
I have never heard of copper fishplates but they would have better conductivity I presume
Has any one come across these? 
Do the copper fishplates originate from the USA 
I think as the hobby moves on and evolves 
bus wires will be superseded with the track providing all power requirements
As stated  more than one way.........
Who’d be a cat!
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Ruffnut Thorston
Think the term, to "fish" a joint was in used to refer to a joint strengthened with a piece across the joint, secured to either side of the joint.

Not necessarily on both sides of a joint...

Therefore, a plate used to fish a joint would be a fish plate.

Over time this would become fish-plate, and then fishplate...

For an example, consider layby...lay bye, lay-bye, laybye, lay-by.

As on layby sidings on the railway, and the layby on a road...

Another good joint is the scarf joint, spelling may vary.

This is the diagonal, tapered joint used to join two planks end to end, and is far stronger than a butt joint, even if fished!

Certainly used when building wooden narrow boats! 🙋
Best wishes,

Ruff...
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Pad-Ply-Pen
Still looking for these elusive copper fishplates has anyone used them Thanks Ruff for that information on the word fishplates funny how many terms in every day life have a maritime origin
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AHJAY
Copper oxidises faster than Nickel Silver, so I do not see it as a solution at all. It is not about conductivity of the metals but the tendency of metals to oxidise after installation. NS solders just as well as copper because copper is a large part of the NS alloy!

However - as to using anything for power transmission... Oxidisation is speeded up when power is transmitted through a mechanical joint between two metals. The acutal choices can be good or bas - example - we reduced the speed of this reaction with our combination of a specific grade of SS bullhead rail and Phosphor Bronze fishplates, but it is still not as good, long term, as using wire.

This discussion has not much to do with voltage drop anyway.
* DCC is not DC or AC. It is a complex square wave with widely differing frequencies and it reacts differently under load, especially if wiring is not done properly. Voltage drops become much bigger than with AC or DC and the waveform itself becomes less accurate if wiring is not appropriate.
* Use fishplates for alignment which is their primary design intent.
* For power delivery, stick with a twisted power bus and appropriate droppers wherever you can!

Ahjay
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JonD

Pad-Ply-Pen wrote:
Still looking for these elusive copper fishplates has anyone used them Thanks Ruff for that information on the word fishplates funny how many terms in every day life have a maritime origin


I think you will be looking for those elusive copper fishplates, for long time......  ! ÃƒÆ’°Å¸ËœÅ½

But seriously,  the difference in conductivity between copper and plated steel (assuming that is what most commercial fishplates are made from), is insignificant.  More important is the surface resistance,  mechanical "grip" ,  and protection against surface oxidisation that will over time, compromise conductivity. 

But best you only rely on  fishplates for mechanical alignment - not electrical connection.

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Pad-Ply-Pen
Thanks all, Penney  has dropped will use fishplates in the manner they were designed for .

One last question from me on this subject 
Is it possible to bulk buy suitable code 75 fishplates 
ppp
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AHJAY
The only "designed to fit" C75 fishplates for flat-bottom rail that I am aware of are Peco. For bullhead we have them (BH BS95R rail is appx C75)

regards, Ahjay
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JonD
AHJAY,  do you know, what are Peco fishplates made from  nicker silver, phosphor bronze,  steel ,  or something else?   Also,  are they then plated?  The colour of them would suggest they are not raw nickel silver i.e. not the same as the rails.  They certainly solder well,  whereas the Hornby fishplates are atrocious  to solder.
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AHJAY
As far as I know, just Nickel Silver. They are a different grade of NS to the rail though (rail is actually a lower grade NS as it has less nickel and so yellows far more)

Ahjay
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Peter Rust Rusty Pete
Oldest precision skill known to man is boat-building.
More than one way to skin a cat ðŸ˜‰
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JonD
Oldest precision skill known to man is boat-building.


Could very well be Pete....... or is it  :-  ðŸ™‚Grinding stone, Dendera Temple, Egypt.
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