Alastairpell Show full post »
Alastairpell
Thanks Ahjay, I will bring the unit to settle first to baseline it, if it works fine then we can see if there is an option for a home visit. 
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Julian


Unfortunately not but I do still have my old Lenz system, that works fine although Ahjay has already stated that the old Lenz systems are by design slower to react to shorts. 


Where about in the country are you?  There are many members on here, there may be one near you with an NCE controller, which might be able to assist.  

Regards

J
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Alastairpell
Hi Ahjay, 

I have now relocated my NCE unit and cab bus away from the track bus. The link wires to the X1 are more like 2 ft long now rather than 3" as before. 'happily' my NCE appears not to be tripping out anymore... But the X1 is now tripping at random instead. So it seems you were right, there is a layout fault somewhere! Although I can now run trains for 5 or 10 minutes before anything trips. 

I have moved my focus to the original board section carried over from my old layout, I ripped out the old dubious track feeder loops including some old seep solenoid motors with frog switch. I have rewired the track bus omitting the seep switches for now. 

I will do some extensive train running at the weekend and see if the problem has gone away... 

Regards 
Alastair 
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AHJAY
Keep at it. The real cause will surface one day.

Meantime keep asking and letting us know how its going...

Ahjay
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Alastairpell
Bingo! Found the problem! I thought it had gone away as it has been a few months since this problem showed itself. I decided to replace a badly placed uncoupling track piece with a new track feeder piece. Yep, no sooner had I turned it on than it was up to its old tricks, cue bad language.
Removed the piece again and blood pressure restored. 
In isolation you get O/C (>400 megohms) between rails or tails so poor insulation isn't the problem. 
Thinking the substandard cable tails were to blame, I prised the cover of with a view to soldering more substantial wires on and got a surprise, hiding under the cover is a tiny capacitor like you get on a loco motor interference suppression! See photo. Not sure why it would cause such random activation of the NCE overload protection without tripping the power shield but evidently it does. 

Next weekend I'll do a bit of experimenting replacing the wires then cutting out the cap and see which it is.
Cheers 
Alastair  Click image for larger version - Name: _20190901_210219.jpg, Views: 24, Size: 183.00 KB
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