Bunkerbarge Show full post »
Iain Morrison wimorrison
The trick is that you have the last wheelset as resistive therefore I know where the back of the train is, that is in addition to knowing the length of the train, and |I have feedbacks on the points which means I know if the last wagon is still sat on a point and if it is then the points cannot change until they are shown as not occupied 🙂

It does make something that is slightly complicated a bit more complicated and adds to the wiring overhead - I have 72 major wires (16/0.2) on this, plus a Loconet cable and all the droppers (7/0.2) to ensure that all sections of track and frogs are fed correctly - who said DCC was just 2 wires!!!!
Iain Morrison
Modelling h0e using Z21 with iTrain automation and Railcom
There are also unknown unknowns – the ones we don't know we don't know
http://www.wimorrison.co.uk
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Bunkerbarge
I thought you would have it covered!!
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Ron Solly Sol
BB, have you seen these?
https://www.dccsupplies.com/item-p-100284/fulgurex-slow-action-point-motor
Ron
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Iain Morrison wimorrison
Ron

interesting - especially on price but they are rather large and you would be pushed to use them on the surface I think.

I also worry about about them being stall motors as when you have a few there is a lot of current being drawn just to keep the points in place

also worth reading the reviews that are there 😉
Iain Morrison
Modelling h0e using Z21 with iTrain automation and Railcom
There are also unknown unknowns – the ones we don't know we don't know
http://www.wimorrison.co.uk
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Bunkerbarge
Hi Ron,  Another interesting option and certainly competitive on price.  I think it would be a lot more difficult to hide below a building than a Cobalt SS and those switch contacts look a little basic but that might just be the impression.  I think with DCC it is well worth trying hard to avoid any possible sources of arcing and exposed switches collecting dust and dirt could eventually go down that path.  Always worth evaluating the possible alternatives though so thanks for the link.  That motor looks exactly like the ones I used to have in my Scalextric cars in the 80s!
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Ron Solly Sol
Certainly not between tracks Iain.
I have a similar unit by Lemarco that switched itself off after each end of the throw & the inbuilt contacts and diodes readied for the reverse movement.
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/lemaco-slow-motion-turnout-point-288479419

All stall motors such as Tortoise & Cobalt have a constant current drain. The Tortoise are good to have LEDs in series with the motor for panel indication -
http://www.circuitron.com/index_files/INS/800-6000ins.pdf
Re Cobalt - that too maybe possible. AhJay should be able to answer that...
Ron
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Ron Solly Sol
This maybe the wrong thread but if the SS is not intended to be used via a DCC system but just to operate turnouts, switch the frog/crossing & indicate on the panel the direction of the turnout, is there any need to Set it outside of getting the amount of throw required & will the PCB remember direction when layout is powered down & then powered up again later and not do a "dance" ? In other words, use it similar to a Peco side mounted motor but with inbuilt contacts for LEDs, etc. !
Ron
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AHJAY
Good luck with the Fulgurex. We tried them some time ago when assessing all that were available and while OK on the surface (apart from extreme noise) when we started reliability testing (lots of use) they had real issues. Especially the contacts... which DO lose reliability as the switches effectively loosen and if not re-tightened regularly, they fall apart. This means stalling under full load (motor failure then inevitable) or loss of power supply... This design has been around for ages (maybe 30 years) and has been sold under several brands. It has never really taken off because of its shortcomings.

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Re Ss / I am not sure that I really get the question in your last post Ron. Are you asking "If it is used on DC, what can it do" then the answers are...

* SS is designed for both DC and DCC use. It works fine with both.
* SS can be both digitally and manually controlled. All features work fine with both
* SS has power off memory.
* It will not go out of adjustment after lots of use because it does not thump across. So - unlike the Peco solenoid it works EVERY time 😋) :-) :-)
(Yes, we have tested it under real world conditions. More than 100k changes reliably with SS. well less than 10k reliable changes with a Peco above board motor)

Yes, all constantly powered motors have some draw. In the case of SS and iP items though, it is exceptionally low. They manage power interactively rather than simply stalling under load.

regards, Ahjay
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Ron Solly Sol
Thanks Ahjay.
Ron
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