AltcarBob
I have a 7 year old Toshiba Satellite C670 laptop It has Windows 7 and a 500gb solid state hard drive. It works fine (apart from a sticky shift key) does everything I want. Its basically a place to store photos, watch Youtube videos and browse the internet for bargain OO bits and bobs.

I was in PCWorld this morning having a browse and it seems like I would have to spend around £600+ to equal or better my current steam powered laptop.

So the question is spend £600+ or spend a lot less and just upgrade to Windows 10 now that Windows 7 is no longer supported with security upgrades.
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LenV
Keep what you have until it dies completely. I got a windows machine last year. I am 73 and can run faster than this. Only use it for my home accounts and ESU Lokprogrammer.
Regards Len
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Stuart Birks StuartB
 Agree with Len. If it is doing what you want then keep it. There is no problem at all in running out of support software. The only thing is to make sure is that any data you have stored on the hard drive is backed up somewhere. The easiet way to do this is to buy a cheap external drive and copy everything to it. The drive can be turned off most of the time, just turn it on to update the data on it then turn it off again. A 7 year old drive is getting on a bit and could fail although most drives last much longer than that. When the machine eventually fails then all your data is ready on another drive to simply copy on to the new machine.
The only software you do need to keep up to date is your anti-virus software but that will run on windows 7 for many jears to come.
Stu
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Julian
I had a similar situation until a couple of weeks ago, with a desktop, Win 7 etc.  It started to play-up with all the win updates, but I took it to a local computer provider / maintenance workshop and they gave it some additional Ram and simply uninstalled Win 7 and replaced it with Win 10.  Now fast again and works well.  Cost for the update and Ram, £110, inc VAT, better than the new ones I had been looking at.

I had backed up all the files, but it simply carried on and connected with all the installed applications, like AnyRail etc.

Regards
J
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AltcarBob
Julian wrote:
I had a similar situation until a couple of weeks ago, with a desktop, Win 7 etc.  It started to play-up with all the win updates, but I took it to a local computer provider / maintenance workshop and they gave it some additional Ram and simply uninstalled Win 7 and replaced it with Win 10.  Now fast again and works well.  Cost for the update and Ram, £110, inc VAT, better than the new ones I had been looking at.

I had backed up all the files, but it simply carried on and connected with all the installed applications, like AnyRail etc.

Regards
J


I think thats the route I will take. Just think of all the money I could save and then blow on goodies.😈
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Julian
AltcarBob wrote:


I think thats the route I will take. Just think of all the money I could save and then blow on goodies.😈


😃😃😃

J
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Bunkerbarge
I don't think that lack of support for Windows 7 is a major issue.  Just because Microsoft decide to pull the plug on support to force more into buying Windows 10 doesn't mean to say that there is not plenty of third party support and advice out there.  The only thing you are going to miss out on of any real value is the security updates  but you can allow a third party software such as Norton or McAfee to do that for you.

I have a laptop with Windows 10 and really don't like it.  I find it very intrusive, doing things in the background that I am not aware of and making updates and changes without me even knowing.  I think I'll wait until my desktop machine is completely dead before looking for a replacement.
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Jaz Avalley JazAvalley

If it is slow and you think a new pc version or a new laptop will be better it maybe, but usually you will find transferring everything to the new one is not at easy as people say, so back up prior to trying this. Intend to keep this one as a back up regardless and ensure it works ok as long as possible in case you do realise you lost something and need to get to it.

I cite the extreme case where a person apparently upgraded and let his hard disks get away from him THEN realised that his BITCOIN wa on the old hard disks, and he had effectively lost all his bitcoin as he no longer had assess to the passwords!

 

For me, 7 sevens? I would consider the upgrade, I would use the other in tandem, and carefully check all and anything I need is safety transferred and not lost if the existing one goes tits up,And regularly update between the two.

 

I abhor wasting money BUT do not lose a fortune (i.e. something you value)to save a penny!

Jaz Avalley

Model Railway Discussion Group

https://www.facebook.com/groups/495282280644117/
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Jaz Avalley JazAvalley

AltcarBob wrote:


I think thats the route I will take. Just think of all the money I could save and then blow on goodies.😈

a good compromise, again back up before you go to a third party. because if they make a mistake they are never going to hold their hands up, they will always blame the machine.

Jaz Avalley

Model Railway Discussion Group

https://www.facebook.com/groups/495282280644117/
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John Bateson
I have a 7 year old Lenovo that I have just stolen back from my daughter. I replaced the hard drive with an SSD drive which speeded things up enormously for just under £50.
Secondly, I use the cloud (Microsoft in my case) and it offers all the security need without paying subscriptions to other software producers. W10 also has more than sufficient security built into it these days.
John
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AltcarBob
John did you use the cloud to do a backup when you installed your SSD. I didn't bother when I had the SSD installed as there was nothing in the memory I wanted to keep. I just used the boot up disc to make sure I didn't lose any thing important.

Now I have been using it for a while there's a fair bit I want to keep. I was going to use a flash drive but I am looking at options.
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Tom G
I generally agree with most of the posts.  If it ain't broke do not try to fix it.
Just a couple of suggestions.
If you decide to upgrade to Win 10 make it a clean installation.  Do not install over Win 7.  I tried installing over Win 7 on two machines and had serious problems requiring a reformat of the drive and re-installing everything.
My one complaint about Win 10 is that updates are pushed out and it is difficult to stop them.  I had one pushed out when I was traveling and on the unreliable hotel wi-fi which resulted in problems.
Also, if you are installing Win 10 it may be a good time to purchase a larger drive and migrate everything over to it.  A 1TB hard drive is under US$50.
RAM upgrade may also help performance.
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Andrew Fryer deepfat
AltCarBob
I have to declare a professional interest here I am an engineer at Microsoft (you can see me on linkedin etc.)
My advice here is pretty simple - Upgrade if you can, don't if you can't. Let me explain.
I can get Windows 10 to run on some pretty ancient hardware, and it is often faster than before as a lot of stuff like anti -virus and firewalls are built in, so I 'd run tests to see if ti will work and as suggested do a custom install, to start from scratch  *** Backup everything first *** .
Secondly and just as importantly check what software you use and check it works with windows 10 or whether there is new version. For example I use RailMaster for DCC control and it's fine on windows 10, though never designed for it.
and if you want help with that  please e-mail me andrew.fryer@microsoft.com and I'll help if I can, simply as a favour to a fellow enthusiast
  
Mr Moderator I would suggest this thread goes in the members lounge 
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Nimbus
I note that a few have said they don't like W10 conducting updates "without knowledge", however if you go into the advance settings in the "Settings - Updates and security" section you can introduce an element of control.  Even to the extent of stopping any automatic updates up to 35 days ahead.  Simples :-)


Steve
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