Robin Sundt Echini Show full post »
Bunkerbarge
As they say "I saw this and thought of you"!

I don't know what engineering is behind it but working in a smaller scale must be very challenging.

Hope you find it interesting:

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Ruffnut Thorston
Very good....but being me, I will have to say that though the trains may be GWR 1930s, The cars and narrow boats are much later in date...😉😀


I suspect a moving magnet for traction...
Best wishes,

Ruff...
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Bunkerbarge
Agreed Ruff.  There are a lot of areas of the modelling that I would have probably done differently but, as an overall scene with an operating lock, it certainly looks the part.

Maybe the train is on a preservation line! 🙂
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Pad-Ply-Pen

T Gauge thought of that as only of continental railway outline did not know it was available for British models I haven’t noticed it advertised 

 

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Ruffnut Thorston
Pad-Ply-Pen wrote:

T Gauge thought of that as only of continental railway outline did not know it was available for British models I haven’t noticed it advertised 

 




I think that most British T gauge is produced as bodies for RTR chassis?

Some information here...

https://www.shapeways.com/product/6LGXM7M6C/flying-scotsman-t-gauge-version2-uses-eishindo-w

There have been some RTR British outline models though...

https://www.tgauge.com/product/365/gner-hst-train-set

https://www.tgauge.com/

And a video of more British outline models...

Best wishes,

Ruff...
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Robin Sundt Echini

Very interesting and difficult to do in such a small scale! 

There is more at modelrailmusings.weebly.com and it appears to use linear motors from Teeny Trains for both the trains and the canal all computer controlled so that it can run things like shunting sequences automatically. 
There is a good example of how it works here:


Not sure how the linear motor system would work with a larger scale model.

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martink
Greetings from a new member.  I noticed that you (plural) had linked to a couple of my videos, and then discovered your (singular) St Catherine's Lock.  This is the only other model railway with a working canal and lock that I have come across, so I thought I might drop in and join the conversation. 

In spite of the completely different scales and drive systems, we seem to have encountered a very similar set of issues and developed similar solutions. Water not being smooth enough, elevators in the lock chamber etc.  I am impressed by someone tackling it all in one of the larger scales.  How do you do the drive for the narrowboat?  Chain?  Leadscrew?
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Robin Sundt Echini

Hi Martink, welcome to the DCCConceptsForum.
The drive on the canal is an inverted toothed belt that runs in The bottom of a channel under the Perspex “water”. A carriage engages with the teeth on the belt, squeezed between the Perspex and the belt by light springs between the top and bottom half of the carriage. A powerful magnet in the top half of the carriage connects with a similar magnet in the boat. There are three looped belts - one above the lock, one in the lock and one below the lock each with its own drive motor. As the carriage is 60mm long and the belt pulleys are just 10mm in diameter, there is a very small gap between the each of the three loops, so the carriage is easily carried from one to the other.
Some Glis powder on the Perspex and on some thin velvet on the bottom of the boat, helps the boat to move smoothly.
One of the challenges was to get the lock to stop exactly in place so that the water was at the same level and the boat didn’t snag as it crossed from one section to the other. The answer was to extend the channel of the “low” water under the “higher” water and then use a micro switch to stop the lock when the two pieces were at the same level.
Another motor turns two M12 nuts that screw the lock up and down and yet two more motors turn the turntables at each end.
The gates are driven by a gearbox each underneath. All the gearboxes, Gears, pulleys, bearings etc, were 3D printed.
All the motors are DC so, when the turntable turns the boat around, It also reverses the polarity of the whole system so it just works the other way and returns the boat through the lock.
The sequence is made slightly easier because on the Wey Navigation, where St Catherine’s lock is situated, the rule is that you leave the gates open as you leave a lock. Almost everywhere else on the canal network you are supposed to close the gates after you leave the lock. That would have made the sequencing a bit more complicated!
I think that each scale brings its own unique problems. It was an interesting challenge!

All the best

Robin

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martink
Thank you for the welcome. 

So, everything is electro-mechanical?  I can imagine that it was a major challenge (aka headache) to design and get running.  I had enough issues with mine, where the mechanics are a lot simpler but the small size makes up for it.  My background is software & electronics, so I naturally view all problems in those terms, and can at least do much of the fine-tuning that way. 

This implementation uses three servos, two for the gates and one for the elevator, driving through brass wires that have a bit of spring allowing for slight overshoots.  The whole structure, visible and not, is 3D printed.  The first version tried to use double gates, but there simply was not enough room for the five servos needed.  The track in the elevator acts as its own hard stop both ways, since joiner extensions have to protrude out below and past the ends of the lower tracks as part of normal track system anyway, so the end result sounds very similar. The water is just painted paper (self-adhesive label paper) stuck to the track with a couple of coats of gloss varnish on top.

The whole setup was my first attempt at a canal system, and is working well enough that I will certainly try another and learn from this batch of mistakes.  Chirk with its side-by-side viaduct and aqueduct sounds just about right...



 
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Robin Sundt Echini
Chirk is an excellent idea as it is very dramatic and the canal goes into a tunnel at one end.
This was us crossing the aqueduct in 2016.
2016-09-16 (42).jpg 
There are lots of places where the railway and canal run together. When the railways were built, many of them followed the canals, which were more or less level. Another interesting place is Crofton Pumping Station on the Kennet and Avon Canal, where two massive beam engines can still each pump a ton of water up to the summit every 11 seconds. The oldest of the two engines was intalled in 1812 and still regularly does the job it was built for. The railway runs in a big sweep between the pumping station and the canal before going into a tunnel and the canal rises through six locks (there is a challenge for you!) before also going into a tunnel.
The wring for the canal is fairly simple as the limit switch for each function triggers the next motor and when that motor hits its limit switch, it triggers the next and so on.
Regards
Robin
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Bunkerbarge
An interesting point you make Robin.  Many railways were originally built specifically to take trade away from the canals and there were many conflicts at the time between canal companies and the railways.  Not surprisingly the railways were built along side the canals to take advantage of the path of least resistance that the canal had already identified plus to tap into the infrastructure that the canal trade had already begun to establish. 
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